Mattis: U.S. identified remains of 2 soldiers killed in Korean War

WASHINGTON, The United States has identified the remains of two soldiers killed in the 1950-53 Korean War following their repatriation from North Korea in July, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Tuesday.

North Korea returned 55 boxes of remains as part of a denuclearization agreement reached between its leader Kim Jong-un and U.S. President Donald Trump at their Singapore summit in June.

Anthropologists have been working to identify the remains at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency lab in Hawaii.

"We have identified a couple of the remains," Mattis told reporters at the Pentagon, clarifying later that it was two sets. "They've moved swiftly on a couple where they thought they had a better chance for a number of reasons -- where the remains came from, and what background we had, and how much we had to work with."

The Pentagon plans to disclose the identifies after first informing the families, according to earlier news reports. One set was identified as a tall black American.

"So there's been, already, some closure for a couple of families that have waited many, many years for this," Mattis said, adding that talks are under way to repatriate the other remains.

The U.S. estimates that some 5,300 American soldiers' remains have yet to be recovered from North Korea.

Source: Yonhap News Agency

Mattis: U.S. identified remains of 2 soldiers killed in Korean War

WASHINGTON, The United States has identified the remains of two soldiers killed in the 1950-53 Korean War following their repatriation from North Korea in July, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said Tuesday.

North Korea returned 55 boxes of remains as part of a denuclearization agreement reached between its leader Kim Jong-un and U.S. President Donald Trump at their Singapore summit in June.

Anthropologists have been working to identify the remains at the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency lab in Hawaii.

"We have identified a couple of the remains," Mattis told reporters at the Pentagon, clarifying later that it was two sets. "They've moved swiftly on a couple where they thought they had a better chance for a number of reasons -- where the remains came from, and what background we had, and how much we had to work with."

The Pentagon plans to disclose the identifies after first informing the families, according to earlier news reports. One set was identified as a tall black American.

"So there's been, already, some closure for a couple of families that have waited many, many years for this," Mattis said, adding that talks are under way to repatriate the other remains.

The U.S. estimates that some 5,300 American soldiers' remains have yet to be recovered from North Korea.

Source: Yonhap News Agency