New intel unit bans monitoring military personnel, installs whistleblowing system

SEOUL, Sept. 2 (Yonhap) -- The newly minted security intelligence unit will be banned from monitoring military personnel and keeping their records, and install a whistleblowing system as part of efforts to ensure its political neutrality, officials said Sunday.

The Defense Security Support Command (DSSC) was launched Saturday after its predecessor, the Defense Security Command (DSC), was disbanded last month following a series of political allegations, including its consideration of martial law to quell anti-government protests in 2017.

The DSSC is tasked with gleaning military intelligence needed to counter any activities harmful to national security, such as espionage. Its predecessor had long been accused of abusing its authority to serve the interests of political leaders.

The official instructions that govern the DSSC operation bar DSSC operatives from surveilling the military personnel, including civilian workers, and keeping their records, which critics said had enabled the DSC to wield inordinate authority prone to abuse.

"Surveillance (of military personnel) itself was an authority that is ridiculous," Nam Young-sin, the DSSC commander, said during a meeting with reporters.

"We will review the records (that have been collected so far), keep only what is needed for our investigation and turn the rest over to archives," he added.

Source: Yonhap News Agency

New intel unit bans monitoring military personnel, installs whistleblowing system

SEOUL, Sept. 2 (Yonhap) -- The newly minted security intelligence unit will be banned from monitoring military personnel and keeping their records, and install a whistleblowing system as part of efforts to ensure its political neutrality, officials said Sunday.

The Defense Security Support Command (DSSC) was launched Saturday after its predecessor, the Defense Security Command (DSC), was disbanded last month following a series of political allegations, including its consideration of martial law to quell anti-government protests in 2017.

The DSSC is tasked with gleaning military intelligence needed to counter any activities harmful to national security, such as espionage. Its predecessor had long been accused of abusing its authority to serve the interests of political leaders.

The official instructions that govern the DSSC operation bar DSSC operatives from surveilling the military personnel, including civilian workers, and keeping their records, which critics said had enabled the DSC to wield inordinate authority prone to abuse.

"Surveillance (of military personnel) itself was an authority that is ridiculous," Nam Young-sin, the DSSC commander, said during a meeting with reporters.

"We will review the records (that have been collected so far), keep only what is needed for our investigation and turn the rest over to archives," he added.

Source: Yonhap News Agency