Senior South Korean diplomat to visit Tokyo amid standoffs over history

SEOUL, Oct. 24 (Yonhap) -- South Korean Vice Foreign Minister Cho Hyun will visit Japan this week for discussions on soured relations between the two sides, his ministry said Wednesday.

Cho's two-day trip to Tokyo through Thursday comes amid a dispute over the fate of the Reconciliation and Healing Foundation, funded by Japan, on Korean sex slaves during World War II.

The foundation was born under the controversial agreement with Japan in 2015 by South Korea's Park Geun-hye administration to resolve the issue of Japan's sexual enslavement of tens of thousands of Koreans, euphemistically dubbed comfort women.

Japan donated 1 billion yen (US$9 million) for the establishment of the foundation.

South Koreans, however, demand the disbandment of the foundation, viewing it as reflecting Japan's attempt to avoid a sincere apology and full responsibility for its past wrongdoings.

President Moon Jae-in has publicly questioned the foundation's effectiveness.

Cho is scheduled to meet with his counterpart, Takeo Akiba, on Thursday, according to the ministry.

"In the consultations this time, the two sides plan to consult on pending issues on South Korea-Japan relations, the security conditions on the Korean Peninsula and other issues of mutual concern," it said without providing further details.

Source: Yonhap News Agency

Senior South Korean diplomat to visit Tokyo amid standoffs over history

SEOUL, Oct. 24 (Yonhap) -- South Korean Vice Foreign Minister Cho Hyun will visit Japan this week for discussions on soured relations between the two sides, his ministry said Wednesday.

Cho's two-day trip to Tokyo through Thursday comes amid a dispute over the fate of the Reconciliation and Healing Foundation, funded by Japan, on Korean sex slaves during World War II.

The foundation was born under the controversial agreement with Japan in 2015 by South Korea's Park Geun-hye administration to resolve the issue of Japan's sexual enslavement of tens of thousands of Koreans, euphemistically dubbed comfort women.

Japan donated 1 billion yen (US$9 million) for the establishment of the foundation.

South Koreans, however, demand the disbandment of the foundation, viewing it as reflecting Japan's attempt to avoid a sincere apology and full responsibility for its past wrongdoings.

President Moon Jae-in has publicly questioned the foundation's effectiveness.

Cho is scheduled to meet with his counterpart, Takeo Akiba, on Thursday, according to the ministry.

"In the consultations this time, the two sides plan to consult on pending issues on South Korea-Japan relations, the security conditions on the Korean Peninsula and other issues of mutual concern," it said without providing further details.

Source: Yonhap News Agency