Veteran politician Sohn runs for opposition party’s leadership election

SEOUL, Sohn Hak-kyu, a veteran politician, announced his bid Wednesday for leader of the minor opposition Bareunmirae Party (BP), vowing efforts for political reform and intraparty unity.

The BP plans to hold its convention on Sept. 2 to elect a new leader after former co-leaders resigned following its defeat in the June local elections.

Sohn, 71, said that he will do his best to prompt the BP to play a central role in driving reform in Korean politics.

"On my final mission, I will (make efforts to) change the current political system," he told a press briefing.

The BP is facing its biggest crisis following a huge defeat in the June 13 local elections and parliamentary by-elections. It won none of the 17 big-city mayoral and gubernatorial posts and 12 parliamentary seats up for grabs in the first nationwide polls for the party.

Ahn Cheol-soo, one of the party's founders, said last month that he will stay away from the political scene for a while after he finished in third place in the Seoul mayoral race.

The BP came into being in February through a merger of two center-right and center-left parties, in what is seen as a bold experiment in South Korea's politics long dominated by regional and ideological divisions.

Sohn's bid added to the return of political bigwigs to the main stage of politics, which some critics have called the comeback of "old boys."

Last month, Lee Hae-chan, the 66-year-old seven term lawmaker, was picked as one of three candidates for the chief of the ruling Democratic Party.

Four-term lawmaker Chung Dong-young, 65, was elected last Sunday to lead the minor opposition Party for Democracy and Peace.

Source: Yonhap News Agency

Veteran politician Sohn runs for opposition party’s leadership election

SEOUL, Sohn Hak-kyu, a veteran politician, announced his bid Wednesday for leader of the minor opposition Bareunmirae Party (BP), vowing efforts for political reform and intraparty unity.

The BP plans to hold its convention on Sept. 2 to elect a new leader after former co-leaders resigned following its defeat in the June local elections.

Sohn, 71, said that he will do his best to prompt the BP to play a central role in driving reform in Korean politics.

"On my final mission, I will (make efforts to) change the current political system," he told a press briefing.

The BP is facing its biggest crisis following a huge defeat in the June 13 local elections and parliamentary by-elections. It won none of the 17 big-city mayoral and gubernatorial posts and 12 parliamentary seats up for grabs in the first nationwide polls for the party.

Ahn Cheol-soo, one of the party's founders, said last month that he will stay away from the political scene for a while after he finished in third place in the Seoul mayoral race.

The BP came into being in February through a merger of two center-right and center-left parties, in what is seen as a bold experiment in South Korea's politics long dominated by regional and ideological divisions.

Sohn's bid added to the return of political bigwigs to the main stage of politics, which some critics have called the comeback of "old boys."

Last month, Lee Hae-chan, the 66-year-old seven term lawmaker, was picked as one of three candidates for the chief of the ruling Democratic Party.

Four-term lawmaker Chung Dong-young, 65, was elected last Sunday to lead the minor opposition Party for Democracy and Peace.

Source: Yonhap News Agency