Mexico’s top radio station to launch ‘hallyu’ program

Mexico's largest radio station will launch a weekly program featuring Korean culture and entertainment next month, the Korean Culture Center in Mexico City said Sunday.

The "K-Hour" program of Radio Centro will air for one hour from 6 p.m. every Sunday.

The radio station has been broadcasting a trial program on "hallyu," or the phenomenal popularity of Korean culture abroad, since June 24 on its channel "Alfa."

In a survey recently conducted by Nielsen, the program drew at least 1.4 million listeners and recorded a 7.33 percent rating, putting it on the list of top ten radio programs.

Radio Centro said the show appealed to listeners with its diverse content from Korean pop songs to classical music and traditional culture.

It is rare for a foreign broadcaster to produce its own hallyu program. Some Chinese and Southeast Asian broadcasters have aired imported hallyu programs.

"The program reflects hallyu taking root in Mexican society," said Lim Sung-min, head of El Coreano, a newspaper for Korean residents in Mexico. "I take pride in the launch of a program exclusively dealing with overall Korean culture."

Source: Yonhap News Agency

Mexico’s top radio station to launch ‘hallyu’ program

Mexico's largest radio station will launch a weekly program featuring Korean culture and entertainment next month, the Korean Culture Center in Mexico City said Sunday.

The "K-Hour" program of Radio Centro will air for one hour from 6 p.m. every Sunday.

The radio station has been broadcasting a trial program on "hallyu," or the phenomenal popularity of Korean culture abroad, since June 24 on its channel "Alfa."

In a survey recently conducted by Nielsen, the program drew at least 1.4 million listeners and recorded a 7.33 percent rating, putting it on the list of top ten radio programs.

Radio Centro said the show appealed to listeners with its diverse content from Korean pop songs to classical music and traditional culture.

It is rare for a foreign broadcaster to produce its own hallyu program. Some Chinese and Southeast Asian broadcasters have aired imported hallyu programs.

"The program reflects hallyu taking root in Mexican society," said Lim Sung-min, head of El Coreano, a newspaper for Korean residents in Mexico. "I take pride in the launch of a program exclusively dealing with overall Korean culture."

Source: Yonhap News Agency